Dude slammed it into the stratosphere…

here, referring to guys like Jason Aldean, Justin Moore, and all those other folks that sing those rock-sounding songs about being country:

“Do they refrain from name dropping guys like Pierce, Snow, Acuff and Gibson because they’ve never head of them, or because their fans have never heard of them?

“I tend to get saddle sores from sitting on this high horse of mine, but when you grow up on a dirt road and actually live a country lifestyle, it’s easy to recognize when some yuppy private school jackoff is cashing in on your way of life. Sadly, the people that live the lifestyle are paying money they don’t have to listen to this watered down bullshit, just so the guy that’s dancing on their backs can buy another sports car and wipe his ass with the country ideal.”

I don’t think I’ve seen it said better than that, though I’m sure AeroDillo can at least match it. 😉

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8 Responses to “Dude slammed it into the stratosphere…”

  1. Windy Wilson Says:

    Saturday I was at a party and the subject of country music came up, with the general opinion that listening to it was a fate worse than death. I can guarantee that the only country they’d heard was the various hat acts and a little bit of the later (and late, sadly) Johnny Cash.

    Gibson? Acuff? Wills? Ritter? Owens? Who?

    Hell, I have trouble sitting through the hat acts.

  2. southtexaspistolero Says:

    I hadn’t heard much of Johnny Cash’s later work, but what I had heard was actually pretty good. Light-years ahead of all those newer hat acts, for sure.

  3. AeroDillo Says:

    The gauntlet is down, I see.

    As it stands I think my last response to Point-Counterpoint might be of some relevance here, but as soon as I kill me some zombies I’ll get my attention pointed towards sticking harpoons in the latest doings and dealings of the pop-hick set.

    Meantime, I’ll allow that a great deal of the music industry (and consumers thereof) has a shamefully short memory. And, as we’ve seen lately, an ever-falling IQ. Accompanying this, sadly, is an increasing degree of belligerence; it’s no longer good enough to proclaim your dirt road credentials – now you have to suffer the bellowings of tone-deaf retards everywhere claiming that they’re country and THAT MAKES THEM BETTER THAN YOU.

    Alas, getting bombed and rolling in pigshit may be terrific fun, but it’s really not an indicator of a superior social standing.

  4. southtexaspistolero Says:

    I think my last response to Point-Counterpoint might be of some relevance here

    Indeed. Oh, and for the record…I miss that music too.

    I’ve been bombed many times. Got that way as the last ex-girlfriend I had before Sabra was packing her stuff. (The designated drinker, if you will.) If I’d known just how good her leaving was going to be, though, it might have been drinking to celebrate as opposed to drinking to alleviate my anger for a bit.

    Never rolled in pigshit, though. I’m sure the morning after rolling in pig shit is as bad as, if not worse than, the morning after getting drunk…

    On the topic of the songs, though, it’s struck me lately that…well, let’s just take my commentary a while back about one of those songs:

    “’Kiss My Country Ass’ is basically the flip side of record labels catering to the people they cater to with, say, Rascal Flatts and Sugarland. ‘Hey, that song’s genius! It’s edgy! It talks about being country and it has the word ass in it! It’s perfect for all those folks whining about Taylor and Sugarland and all the rest! Maybe they’ll shut their traps now!’

    “Cynical? Sure it is. But not any less cynical than Blake’s recording itself.”

    I could be all wrong, but it does sort of make sense.

  5. Dwight Brown Says:

    “I hadn’t heard much of Johnny Cash’s later work, but what I had heard was actually pretty good.”

    I should probably do a longer post on my own blog about this. But what the heck.

    I’m not any kind of Johnny Cash expert. I’ve got an odd mix of older (Folsom Prison) and newer stuff, most of the newer stuff being covers. What strikes me about the later Cash work is his ability to elevate just about anything he touches.

    For example, Bob Marley’s “Redemption Song” is one of my favorite songs. But Cash (and to be fair, Joe Strummer) do pretty amazing things with their version of the song: I’d have to say it is at least as good as the original, and possibly better. (It depends on what day you catch me on.)

    “Hurt” is the best example of this. The original version is a whiny song by a drug addict. Cash turns it into an emotional song about a man at the end of his life, looking backwards at what he’s done and feeling that it is all a waste. “And you can have it all, my empire of dirt.”

    It is hard for me to listen to that song. It is almost impossible for me to watch the video unless I’m in a seriously depressed mood.

    I realize that there’s a lot of work and practice and experience behind all of that, but i wonder; is there anyone working today who, in 20 or 30 or 40 years, will have the same ability to transcend the material they’re given and make it their own, the way Cash did?

  6. southtexaspistolero Says:

    is there anyone working today who, in 20 or 30 or 40 years, will have the same ability to transcend the material they’re given and make it their own, the way Cash did?

    I’m betting the answer to that is probably “no.” And Cash’s rendition of “Hurt” is a masterpiece, both the song and the video. Nine INch Nails frontman Trent Reznor had this to say about it:

    I pop the video in, and wow… Tears welling, silence, goose-bumps… Wow. [I felt like] I just lost my girlfriend, because that song isn’t mine anymore… It really made me think about how powerful music is as a medium and art form. I wrote some words and music in my bedroom as a way of staying sane, about a bleak and desperate place I was in, totally isolated and alone. [Somehow] that winds up reinterpreted by a music legend from a radically different era/genre and still retains sincerity and meaning — different, but every bit as pure.”

  7. AeroDillo Says:

    “Cynical? Sure it is.”

    Not really. From a logical standpoint, it’s a safe deduction to say that any industry stupid enough to pass Taylor Swift/Rascal Flatts/Sugarland/et al off as country is also heartless enough to rub salt in the wounds by peppering the survivors with Blake Shelton and Jason Aldean.

    The flipside of a turd is still a turd.

  8. southtexaspistolero Says:

    From a logical standpoint, it’s a safe deduction to say that any industry stupid enough to pass Taylor Swift/Rascal Flatts/Sugarland/et al off as country is also heartless enough to rub salt in the wounds by peppering the survivors with Blake Shelton and Jason Aldean.

    Well, i think so too, but some self-righteous asshole asked me where the evidence was to support my opinion. I just figured it was self-evident.

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