Of all the things to criticize the other side for…

this is not one of them:

“A symbol of American greatness will be towed to its final resting place by a foreign competitor, forever cementing the image of a Toyota truck towing a retired space shuttle,” Matt Frendewey, director of communications for the Michigan Republican Party, told the Detroit News. “The symbolism of this PR stunt should be offensive to every red-blooded American with vested interest in the success of the U.S. automotive industry.”

Sorry, but this is ever so much bullshit. Considering that the Toyota Tundra is assembled in San Antonio — and that some 75 percent of its parts are made in either the United States or Canada — that truck is every bit as American as a Ford, Chevrolet or Dodge. You could say it’s probably more American than the Chevrolet or Dodge, considering it’s only the Ford F-150 that has at least as many of its parts made in the U.S. or Canada. Apparently Matt Frendewey thinks it would be better if the shuttle were towed by an allegedly American-made truck that was assembled in Canada with an engine and transmission that was put together in, say, China.

That wasn’t meant as a slam at Canadians or Chinese, by the way. I am pretty sure that Live from the Alamo City Command Central (a 13″ late-2011 model MacBook Pro) was put together in China, and it is without a doubt the nicest computer I have ever owned. And I don’t know for sure, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the first vehicle I ever owned, my grandfather’s 1985 Ford F-150, was assembled in Canada. And even if it wasn’t, it did have the 351-cid Windsor V-8, so named because it came from the Ford plant in Windsor, Ontario. It was a great truck, too.

At any rate, though, those of us who haven’t already, need to get past this mentality that foreign-owned companies are automatically bad when it comes to things like this. Outsourcing to foreign countries benefits Americans every bit as much as it does other countries — in fact, it probably benefits us more so, because of the higher wages here. (I don’t even want to think about how much a Mac would cost if it was put together by union labor in Michigan.) And it’s really unbecoming to snipe at all those foreign-owned companies that provide so many great jobs here.

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6 Responses to “Of all the things to criticize the other side for…”

  1. Peter Drysdale Says:

    That is pretty ridiculous. Let’s see, Mississippi has both a Toyota and Nissan plant, Tennessee has two Nissan plants and a new Volkswagen plant, Alabama has a Mercedes and I think Hyundai plant. South Carolina has BMW. I could go on but I don’t really know what else is out there. The fact is, if nothing else, those 8 factories employee thousands of Americans making good money. And that doesn’t even include all the peripheral factories that produce parts for those auto factories. Within 20 miles of where I sit there is a Nissan engine factory and probably 10 plants producing parts for Nissan. That’s a lot of good American jobs.

  2. southtexaspistolero Says:

    Yep. I have heard some folks say that BMW stands for “Bubba Makes Wheels.”

  3. GomeznSA Says:

    Peter D – I suspect that if you check out the plants you cited – NONE are union operated.
    And that is probably why Matt Frendeway was so ‘offended’ – there was no union connection. To them, that is all that counts, not the thousands of jobs that the companies provide. But otoh, aren’t the ‘progressives’ always saying that we are one big global family???

  4. southtexaspistolero Says:

    You’re probably right, Gomez; that crossed my mind as well. I am pretty sure Mississippi is a RTW state just like Texas.

  5. GomeznSA Says:

    stp – actually BMW means ‘bring more wampum’ 😉 I have a beemer (2 wheels – 4 wheeled ones are bimmers).

  6. Albatross Says:

    My Honda was made in Alabama. And I like it.

    And that is probably why Matt Frendeway was so ‘offended’ – there was no union connection.

    Which means the South, to him, is as bad as a foreign country.

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