Stuff that’s bound to tick some folks off…

…in this list here….

I was quite amused at the bit about “believing what you get at Taco Bell is a real gordita.” God knows I ate enough Taco Bell “gorditas” before I came to San Antonio, but I don’t think I was naive enough to think it was the real thing. What’s that, you say? Have I eaten any more TB since I came to San Antonio? Oh hell no. As I so often say anymore to my Texas friends, why would anyone eat at Taco Bell when they have access to Taco Cabana? And then there are all the real Mexican restaurants around here.

(Funny story: I spent a few years in the Bryan-College Station area, which is where I first discovered Taco Cabana. There was also another Mexican chain there, a sit-down outfit called Casa Olé. When I moved to the Golden Triangle, one of the first things I noticed was that they had Casa Olé there. And I thought, with arguably no solid justification whatsoever, Surely they have Taco Cabana here since there’s Casa Olé. Hand to God, I spent a solid month looking for Taco Cabana before I gave up. The closest TC to the Golden Triangle is in Pasadena…)

There was also the bit about “eating hot sauce from outside the state.” Ordinarily I wouldn’t have batted an eye — but it was accompanied by — wait for it! — a picture of several bottles of Sriracha. I know quite a few people who have a fascination with that stuff, and I have yet to figure out just why. Not that it’s bad, mind you, just overrated. I am bitterly clinging to my belief that they’ve never tried Cholula. It’s the only thing keeping my sanity intact as far as this goes. I made the observation not long ago that if someone ever suggested Sriracha on brisket I would spontaneously combust. Just about the only thing I have with my brisket anymore is a warm flour tortilla wrapped around it. (Oh, what’s that? Brisket taco, you say? YES. If you haven’t had one of those, especially for breakfast, you are totally missing out.)

Speaking of that, though, while beef is my favorite bbq meat, I would surely not turn up my nose at some tasty pork ribs or sausage…

And who would argue that the best country music comes from Nashville anymore? I’ve made the observation before that just because certain music comes from Texas doesn’t make it better by default, but at least our guys don’t come up with lyrical dreck like Florida Georgia Line’s “Get Your Shine On” (“slide that sugar shaker over here”) or Chase Rice’s “Ready Set Roll” (which features the timeless line “get ya little fine ass on the step shimmy up inside”). I remember back when the Texas music scene was on the rise, one of the rallying cries was “Nashville Sucks!” And a lot of Nashville music did suck then, but even back then it wasn’t as bad as it is now.

Anyway, that’s a pretty cool list. Check it out.

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7 Responses to “Stuff that’s bound to tick some folks off…”

  1. Sabra Morse Onstott Says:

    You were hungry when you wrote this, eh?

  2. Crotalus Says:

    Cholula is the best hot sauce, because it’s not only hot; it’s flavorful as well. You can taste the peppers and spices as well as feel the heat–and they are two different things.

    • southtexaspistolero Says:

      Yep, Crotalus, that’s exactly why I like it so. I once said I would eat Cholula on pretty much anything but cake. 😉 I might even eat it on brisket! I have NEVER been big on sauces that have more heat than flavor. (That’s not a slam at Sriracha, just a general observation.) It’s like, what is this stuff good for other than to camouflage the food’s flavor or lack thereof? We bought a so-called “Cajun turkey” a couple of years ago from HEB for Thanksgiving that was like that — all heat, no flavor. Hand to God, that is literally the ONLY HEB-branded product I’ve ever had that I was actually disappointed with.

  3. mick129 Says:

    One of the last ones about the flag was confusing. It said “The Texas state flag is the only state flag that is flown at equal height to the U.S. flag. Any state flag may be flown at an equal height to the U.S. flag as long as the national flag is at the leftmost staff pole from the perspective of the viewer.”

    I’ve heard the first part before, but the second part is contradictory. Snopes claims that the second part is more correct:
    http://www.snopes.com/history/american/texasflag.asp

  4. southtexaspistolero Says:

    Yeah, mick, the bit about the flag was confusing. I’d heard before that the Texas flag was allowed to fly above the American flag over the years but wasn’t sure how true it was.

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