Tuesday music musings, 17.2.14

Via Country California, it sounds like we have another budding Keith Urban on our hands, as if the original wasn’t obnoxious enough…

Country music has always been diverse. With all the pop country happening now, people are worried it’s not country. But I go back to a time in the 1980s with Eddie Rabbitt and Conway Twitty singing songs that were very pop. At that time people were saying the same kind of thing. Now we look back and think of those guys as pure country.

Sigh. As I’ve said before, the latter simply isn’t true, at least not for any country fan with any kind of perspective or knowledge of the genre. And this “country music has always been diverse” seems to imply that it still is — which of course is another filthy freaking lie, considering it all seems to be about girls, trucks and beer, lather, rinse, repeat.

===

And as if everything going on up to now in country music wasn’t bad enough, now we have this. Honestly, I must say the whole thing leaves me aghast. I have to wonder if there’s ever been a time in country music where two hot and very rapidly burning fads have been chased consecutively like this. The landscape’s different now, what with the Texas, red dirt, and general alternative country scenes more thriving and vibrant than they were the last time Nashville was chasing bullshit trends so hard. So there is at least more of an alternative to the mainstream crap, but even so it’d still be pretty nice to turn on country radio and actually hear country music.

===

Speaking of Texas music, with a few exceptions this is a really good primer on the best of it. Of course, it does have its flaws — Miranda Lambert is here but Billy Joe Shaver isn’t, really? “Georgia On A Fast Train” belongs on pretty much any best-of list of Texas music worthy of the name. Hell, I’d have been happy if Jason Boland’s version of “Thunderbird Wine” had been on there as opposed to Miranda Lambert’s “Me And Charlie Talkin’,” even if that would have been the second song with that particular bum wine in the title….

Also, Kevin Fowler but no Gary P. Nunn? FAIL.

But at least they had Stoney LaRue’s version of “Down in Flames.” I had heard Brandon Jenkins recorded that same song at some point and listened to it one day…and, well, as I put it then, I like pretty much everything I’ve heard from BJ, but Stoney’s version of “Down in Flames” beats his like a rented mule.

Also, Adam Hood’s “I’ll Sing About Mine” should have ranked higher than No. 44, if only for its significance as a protest song. I know I’ve said before that I like protest songs better that decry longer-term trends, but at the same time that song cut right to the heart with what’s so wrong with this bro-country crap and it did so in a way that has yet to be equaled:

When you talk about the Dairy Queen, pickup trucks and Springsteen, you make the place I love sound like a bad cartoon

If that line isn’t the best single song lyric of the last ten years at least, it’s still pretty high up there.

Advertisements

Tags:

2 Responses to “Tuesday music musings, 17.2.14”

  1. Jeff Bauer Says:

    From the Saving Country Music link: “A modestly-successful songwriter, Sam Hunt was willing to take the mother of all plunges with fellow songwriter, and apparently producer Shane McAnally…”

    McAnally?

    *spew*
    *coffee dripping down face of monitor screen*
    BWAHAHAHAHA

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: