Monday music musings, 17.4.17

It’s a fine and noble thing to wish for, but we’re not going to get a Randy Travis or Dwight Yoakam-inspired album or even single out of the likes of Thomas Rhett. He has made no secret of the fact that he’s a bigger fan of rock and pop than country; in fact, he’s so lacking in self-awareness that he wears it like a badge of honor. The closest Rhett would ever get to that would probably be something inspired by Bryan White, or maybe Mark Wills, i.e., nothing even in that time zone. I have said it before and will say it again: Thomas Rhett is the very personification of what Alan Jackson sings about in “Gone Country.” I saw Don Henley cited in the comments as someone who made pop and country records that were equally good, but to the extent that Cass County works as a country album (and it does so very well, IMO), that’s because of Don Henley’s love of country music. One of the songs on Cass County was a cover of the Louvin Brothers’ “When I Stop Dreaming,” and another, “The Cost of Living,” was a duet with Merle Haggard.

But Thomas Rhett doesn’t have that. If you asked Rhett who the Louvin Brothers were, he’d probably say they were the guys who did “Summer in the City.”

And as far as Maren Morris goes, can the mainstream media please stop pushing her as country music’s next great female hope now? “My Church” was more or less the inverse of “I Hope You Dance” — i.e., the best, most country song on Morris’ album, with the rest of it being a bunch of pop music masquerading as country, and now there’s this mess with Thomas Rhett. If there was any justice in it, her career as a country music singer would be finished.

Speaking of IHYD, we heard that song the other night when we were out for dinner. And it reminded me of certain observations I’ve made elsewhere, specifically:

The worst thing about the song “I Hope You Dance” was not that it was too pop-sounding, nor that it was dreadfully overrated, though the latter is definitely true. No, the worst thing about that song was that it wasn’t even close to an accurate reflection of who Lee Ann Womack was and is as an artist. It wasn’t even typical of the songs on the album that shared its title. I remember people falling all over themselves praising that song, people who didn’t normally pay that much if any attention to country music in general, and I thought, “You people have no idea…”

I have said before that beyond the title track, I Hope You Dance was a pretty typical Lee Ann Womack album, and that I regretted holding off on buying it for so long, and the inverse of that is likely true to some extent. What do I mean, you ask?

Well, let’s put it like this: I would be interested to know how many pop music fans bought that album and were turned off by “The Healing Kind,” “Lonely Too,” and “Does My Ring Burn Your Finger,” i.e., what is this twangy bullshit?

Advertisements

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: