Posts Tagged ‘music’

Random drive-by rant: San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo

November 11, 2016

This? This is the lineup for the 2017 lineup for the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo? Sam Hunt? The Band Perry? Dan + Shay? Good grief. Last year the lineup included Alan Jackson, Gary Allan, and the Turnpike Troubadours.

At least they have Aaron Watson this year. And I suppose the final lineup might not be the dumpster fire it looks like right now, as several of those slots are still yet to be determined. But just…wow. Pretty much the only thing that’d fully make up for Sam Hunt would be a George Strait appearance — but I seriously doubt we’re gonna get that, as Strait has only played the San Antonio rodeo twice, in 1986 and 1990. Jason Boland? Randy & Wade? Another TT appearance? We’ll see, I guess…

An appropriate song for the day…

November 8, 2016

…right here.

First time I heard this song was back during the 2000 election season on Dallas country radio when I was living in North Texas. Still a great song, even if we’d have to bring Cash back from the dead.

“He would unite the whole nation, with his guitar and a song….”

And God knows that’s exactly what we need anymore.

Drive-by rant: Por que no los dos?

November 8, 2016

Seen on Facebook this morning, a meme with the following sentiment:

“Country music needs more of George Strait and Alan Jackson and less of the Dixie Chicks and Beyonce.”

Well hey, why not both? (Maybe not Beyonce, though I will say that if “Daddy Lessons” is played on country radio, I’d much rather it be with the Dixie Chicks.)

Here’s a proposition for you, Sparky:

If we still had the Dixie Chicks, we’d still have both Alan and George too. How’s that, you ask?

Well, let’s put it like this. I’ll readily acknowledge that the Dixie Chicks were at least a little controversial in their day even before The Incident, but I do not see how it can possibly be argued that they were not one of the most traditional acts the mainstream has seen in at least the last quarter-century. They managed to sell more than 6 million copies of an album that was not just traditional country, but almost pure bluegrass, in the era of Shania Twain and Faith Hill. With the musical leadership they provided, with the example they set on how to make actual country music and still have commercial success, they — along with George, Alan, Lee Ann Womack, and others I am probably forgetting right offhand — could have helped lay the groundwork for the next generation of traditional country in the mainstream. The level of quality control on Music Row would have been radically different, to the point that, as I have said before, the likes of Florida-Georgia Line, Sam Hunt, and Thomas Rhett would never have been given the time of day in Nashville, the latter two would have gone on to be the shitty pop music flashes in the pan that they should have been considered all along, and we’d still have quality music on the radio that at least bore some resemblance to country in addition to all the great independent stuff. Would that new mainstream music have been as good as Boland, the Turnpike Troubadours, et al? Probably not, but it would still be miles ahead of the swill radio’s peddling now.

And how would George & Alan still have been here? Well — and again, I’m probably just spitballing here — with the traditional music still getting played, there still might have been room for them on the radio.

But instead…we have what we have now. I don’t know what’s worse, that or the possibility that more than a few people still think it was worth the Chicks getting booted from country music because they didn’t agree with what the Chicks said. You know, I didn’t agree with ’em either, but some things are bigger than mere politics — or should be, anyway.

Thursday music musings, 3.11.16

November 3, 2016

So, about the CMAs last night…

Chris Stapleton winning Male Vocalist and Video and Luke Bryan getting completely shut out? Hey, I’ll take that. Like I have said before, I am not a Stapleton fan by any means, but as the old saying goes, any chair in a bar fight.

I also heard that both George Strait and Alan Jackson got full performance slots. Good for them. It sucks that they don’t get played on the radio anymore, but again, hey, little victories.

I gotta admit, I was quite surprised to see Garth Brooks take home Entertainer of the Year. A lot of people seemed to think it was Carrie Underwood’s time, and if I had to guess who would have taken it, I probably would have guessed she would be it. Not that I really give a damn one way or the other, really, but I thought it was pretty neat that Garth Brooks won just for another FU to Gary “if you’re not on country radio you don’t exist” Overton.

Finally, it was pretty cool that the Dixie Chicks got themselves a performance slot on the CMAs after a full 15-year absence from the show and more than a decade since their blackballing from country music — but then on the other hand I have to wonder if they’d have gotten that if they’d elected to sing one of their own hit songs (or a new song) as opposed to Beyonce’s “Daddy Lessons,” with Beyonce, even. I listened to the original version of the song, and I gotta say, I don’t get how people think it’s actually country. It sounds to me a lot more like, say, Dixieland jazz. Not that it’s bad, mind you. And I know the Chicks have done non-country covers before. Still, though, right or wrong, it reminded me of all the awkward pop star appearances on CMA award shows past, from Meghan Trainor last year to N-Sync with Alabama back in 1999. I thought about how Sammy Kershaw talked of how country music is seemingly the only genre that is ashamed of itself and how it tries to be everything but country. I thought about Dierks Bentley talking about how they weren’t all sitting on hay bales passing out the awards or whatever. And all of it is just another reminder that that attitude still seems to be there, and I have to wonder if it’ll ever subside to the point that mainstream country will ever sound, well, country again. Baby steps, I guess…

In memory of Curly Putman…

October 31, 2016

…who died Sunday.

Most folks know “Green, Green Grass of Home” as being recorded by Porter Wagoner, but that song has actually been recorded by…well, damn near everybody who had a recording career worth talking about, it seems. And I haven’t heard them all…

…but I am not sure that there was a better version of it than Merle Haggard’s.

Sunday music musings, 30.10.16

October 31, 2016

Oh, look, more Authorized Journalism, from the same person who presented Sam Hunt to us as “country’s most forward-thinking stylist”:

The year’s best country album comes from Maren Morris, and if the trophy gods deliver justice at the 50th annual CMA Awards on Wednesday, she’ll win a prize for it. The 26-year-old is a straight-talking, forward-thinking fountain of dash, and she’s funneling it into some great country music.

Uh, NOPE. I’ve heard bits of the Maren Morris album — as in, 30-second samples of all the songs on Amazon — and it sounds a whole lot to me like some unholy hybrid of Pink and Kelsea Ballerini. Not country in the slightest, in other words. My take wasn’t quite as virulent as Trigger’s, but then that was probably because I didn’t really have high expectations in the first place. To be honest, I really didn’t think “My Church” was all that, either. I’d been hearing people singing its praises, and I heard it and was rather baffled. Sure, it was more substantive than Kelsea Ballerini, but beyond that I thought it was kinda meh. It was all the more confusing that I heard the song on 95.9 the Ranch. I can only guess that they were playing the song because Morris is an Arlington native, but then if they were going to play artists just on that criterion we’d have been hearing this monstrosity.

Can I think of albums that better deserve that Album of the Year nominee slot? Why yes, yes I can — pretty much any of the albums mentioned here that were released during the CMA eligibility period, for one, and we can now add to that list Courtney Patton’s So This Is Life.

Yeah, I know. I catch a lot of crap in some corners for my bitching about mainstream country music. I hear people say things to the effect of, “why don’t you just ignore it and concentrate on the good stuff?” And I try to do that. After all, of course, country music is a lot more than the mainstream crap that’s played on the radio. And of course, Chris Richards is just one person, and he’s far from the only one whose observations about country music are way off base.

But here’s the deal — this is about more than just crappy mislabeled music that is at best the musical equivalent of mystery meat casserole. It’s about giving idiots space to write things like this

Musically, (‘Daddy Lessons’) draws on country, folk, soul, and other genres made popular by Black American musicians in the 19th and 20th centuries. One could argue that, in doing so, Beyoncé was attempting to reclaim these styles from the Elvis Presleys, Iggy Azaleas, and countless other white entertainers who decontextualized them in the decades that followed, even if her efforts fell on deaf ears throughout many corners of Nashville. (One particularly not good article over at CMT asked, ‘What’s So Country About Beyoncé?’) Perhaps not unrelated, the 2016 CMA Award nominees are almost entirely all white.

…which forces people to admit that Beyonce’s “Daddy Lessons” might be more country than, say, anything Sam Hunt or Thomas Rhett ever put out. But the problem with that is that it obscures the larger, more important point — which is that Sam Hunt as a country singer, or Thomas Rhett as a country singer, never should have been a thing in the first place. It brings to mind the old Thomas Pynchon quote: — “If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don’t have to worry about answers.”

(Also, anyone who points to Alison Bonaguro as any kind of authority is a flaming idiot.)

Because you know what is definitely more country than anything Sam Hunt ever put out? George Strait, that’s who. There is no good reason whatsoever that he and Alan Jackson — or, for that matter, Sturgill Simpson, Aaron Watson, Jason Boland, or the Turnpike Troubadours — shouldn’t still be played other than the recent demographic shift that’s killing the genre anyway. These people talk about evolution of the genre and all that, completely ignoring the fact that they’re setting the stage for the genre of country music to be burned down with no hope of ever rebuilding it to anything approaching its former beauty.

Which reminds me of this:

There’s not any cool rock bands any more.

Oh, Jason Aldean. Surely that couldn’t have anything to do with rock music’s boundaries being destroyed as people started categorizing rock music as “anything white people listen to” and calling pretty much anything rock, could it? Nah, that couldn’t be it.

Thursday music musings, 25.6.16

August 25, 2016

So, Blake Shelton is a homophobic, possibly racist douchebag? And his fans so blindly rush to defend him, talking about “social justice warrior bullshit” and the like? Quelle surprise.

But of course, this has nothing to do with social justice or political correctness and everything to do with him being a decent human being by not implying, among other things, that being gay is a bad thing and that people who don’t speak English are automatically terrorists. Shelton’s entitled to his opinion, but if he’s gonna come out and say asshole things out loud, I don’t understand why calling him out for such has to be decried as “social-justice warrior BS.” Like it or not, he is a representative of country music to the general public, and he needs to comport himself as such.

But the whole problem here is much, much larger than Blake Shelton making racist, homophobic tweets, or Jason Aldean dressing in blackface. I think it’s probably safe to say that mainstream country music in general, not just Blake Shelton, is catering to a different kind of fan anymore. People who want to constantly listen to songs about partying in a cornfield in front of a bonfire on a tailgate with a scantily-clad nameless girl because “that’s what they know” — the “boys ’round here,” one might call them — don’t really present themselves as any kinds of deep thinkers. Songs like George Strait’s “Amarillo By Morning” or Aaron Watson’s “Bluebonnets” might as well be written in Portuguese for all those people are able to comprehend them, never mind a song like Jason Boland’s “Fat And Merry,” wherein he sings about “re-gentrify(ing) the shitty part of town.” It’s all shallow, ignorant music for shallow, ignorant people, who don’t know any better than to keep their mouths shut about said ignorance as opposed to putting it on display for all the world to see; for further evidence of this all you have to do is see the recurring Country TwitterFAIL feature at Farce the Music.

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I do love Suzy Bogguss, but I’d rather hear actual new music from her. I may be alone here, but I really don’t understand artists re-recording older hits, let alone entire albums. As I have put it elsewhere, I can count on one hand the re-recordings of older songs that were as good as or better than the originals, and they were all on the same album by the same artist.

(Billy Joe Shaver’s Tramp On Your Street, for the record; the songs were “Oklahoma Wind” and “Georgia On A Fast Train.”)

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This. This right here goes to the heart of my complaints about mainstream country music in general and Keith Urban in particular. Every — Single — Time Keith Urban talks about the evolution of country music, he points to — you guessed it! — countrypolitan. He has never said one word about the Bakersfield sound, the Outlaw movement, the Urban Cowboy movement and the fallout in the wake of that, the neotraditionalist movement of the mid-1980s, or the class of 1989. It’s always countrypolitan. You want to talk about the evolution of country music? Okay. By all means let’s do so. But let’s talk about all of it, not just the part of it that bolsters the argument in favor of the actual country music influences being pushed out in favor of influences from practically every other genre of mainstream music. To do otherwise, to focus on one era to the exclusion of all the others — as Keith Urban is doing and has done since day one — is incredibly self-serving, dishonest, and insulting. He’s insufferable enough as an artist as it is, but this just takes the whole thing into the stratosphere.

Friday music musings, 19.8.16

August 19, 2016

From the Houston Chronicle:

 “It’s interesting to see the diversity of what young people will buy…Obviously, things like Led Zeppelin or (Jimi) Hendrix. But Nat King Cole records sell really well to 20-somethings.”

Well, that’s something. People keep saying, “the kids don’t buy their grandpa’s music!” but as it turns out they do like it quite a bit. Not that it was a big surprise, but that’s still a really neat thing to see. It’s going to be interesting to see what happens with that in the coming years, as “grandpa’s music” gets to be, say, Florida-Georgia Line. I mean, I like to think the people who like that crap will grow out of it and won’t be playing it for their grandkids, which means that it wouldn’t really be “grandpa’s music,” but one never knows…

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I heard somebody say that Chris Lane was a great singer. We might just have to agree to disagree on that one. He sounds to me like a Tim McGraw knockoff, only without the good songs, at least if “Fix” is any indication. Tim’s voice never was all that, but at least he’s had the sense to pick good, even GREAT, songs to record. But “Fix” is just hot garbage any way it’s sliced, and there’s little if any reason to expect anything else from him to be better — especially with him saying to Rolling Stone in a recent interview that “country music has room for a little bit of everything.”

And he follows that up with mentions of FGL, Sam Hunt…and Chris Stapleton.

HELLO! One of those things is not like the other, on a couple of different levels! Sam Hunt and FGL are just two different kinds of bad yet they score hits left and right, and country radio barely gives Stapleton the time of day! I mean, that’s not quite as ignorant as Kelsea Ballerini’s commentary on the state of country radio in relation to female artists, but it’s more than close enough for government work.

Also, I will say that it is rather gratifying to see Lane’s low album sales in relation to his radio airplay. I know album sales are getting to be less and less of a thing, but it’s good to see that people won’t give that dude their hard-earned money no matter how much “country” radio tries to force him down their throats. He sold 6,000 copies of his album in its first week in the stores, with “Fix” hitting No. 1 the week before its release. 6,000 copies…Jason Boland and the Stragglers’ latest album, Squelch, sold 2/3 of that in its first week, and they’ve never had a radio hit outside of certain regions in Texas and Oklahoma. And then, of course, there are the successes of the likes of Aaron Watson, Alan Jackson, and Jason Isbell, who all had Top 2 chart debuts with their latest albums as opposed to Lane’s No. 8, selling 26,000, 46,000, and 46,000 copies their first weeks on the charts respectively. And then back in September, the newest albums from Don Henley and George Strait came in at No. 1 and No. 2 as they both sold more than 80,000 copies each…yet again, with scant if any country radio airplay.

But “if you’re not on country radio, you don’t exist!” All righty then…

(Also…a cover of Mario’s “Let Me Love You”? Really?! WHAT THE…? The original version of that song sucked! We didn’t need a cover of it! I mean, yeah, Aaron Watson covered John Mayer on his last album, but at least it it was a decent song that sounded country, which is more than can be said of the Chris Lane monstrosity!)

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Oh hey, new Metallica…

Not bad, not bad at all. Pretty badass, in fact. It sounds a lot like …And Justice for All meets Death Magnetic — with much better production than either of those albums. I had heard Lars Ulrich quoted as saying Metallica’s forthcoming album would be “less frenetic” than Death Magnetic, and to be brutally honest, I did not find such encouraging at all; it’s not as if Death Magnetic was on the level of Kill ‘Em All in terms of speed and intensity. If this is what they’re going to define as “less frenetic,” I’m perfectly okay with that. According to other reports it’s going to be a double album with about 80 minutes of music. I am quite interested to see what the rest of it sounds like.

Thursday music musings, 11.8.16

August 11, 2016

So the Dixie Chicks sold out the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion this last weekend on their first United States tour in ten years, eh?

Bully for them, and for country music too. I sure as hell hope that’s at least some kind of indication that the mainstream country audience is ready for some semblance of real, substantive, actually COUNTRY music to return to the mainstream, because what we’re having to deal with as far as the mainstream goes these days makes me sick unto death. The late 1990s and early 2000s were far from any kind of golden age for country, but they were a damned sight better than what we have now. At least back then we still had George Strait and Alan Jackson; even with the decline in quality of Jackson’s output after 2002’s Drive, it was still miles ahead of any of today’s A-list stars.

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Speaking of George Strait, I thought it was a neat little surprise to see his sophomore album, Strait From the Heart, reviewed at Saving Country Music — and even more so to see it get a top grade. Now, I did (and do) think it’s a very enjoyable listen, but at least a couple of those songs did not age so well, particularly “The Steal of the Night” and “Lover In Disguise.” I thought he’d be a lot harsher on that album than he was, especially considering that the aforementioned songs were likely there due to the influence of producer Blake Mevis, who was pushing Strait in a more pop direction. Strait actually parted ways with Mevis as the next album was being put together and started over with a new producer. It was probably better for all involved, though, because I think that album, 1983’s Right or Wrong, was where Strait really hit his stride. “Let’s Fall to Pieces Together” is my all-time favorite George Strait song and has been such ever since I’ve been a fan.

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On another George Strait-related note, I’m pretty sure he’s mostly responsible for this:

Aaron Barker, the San Antonio native behind some of George Strait’s big hits, has been named to the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame.

In the interests of full disclosure, I must admit that most of the non-Strait songs with Barker’s name on them were meh at best, but the songs that Strait recorded rank among the best of his career, particularly “I Know She Still Loves Me” and “I Can Still Make Cheyenne.” I’ve always thought the former was an underrated gem, and the latter would make my top ten of not just singles, but songs he’s recorded, period.

(And I don’t think I ever mentioned it till now, but I always thought “I Can Still Make Cheyenne” worked very well as a prequel of sorts to “The Cowboy Rides Away,” which in turn works quite well as a prequel to “Amarillo By Morning”…)

Wednesday music musings, 4.8.16

August 4, 2016

Brad Beheler at Galleywinter posts a fine tribute to Hastings, the Amarillo-based music store chain that’s on the verge of closing.

I certainly hated to hear it, myself. God knows I love the convenience of Amazon, but I have some quite fond memories of that place. I bought my first Texas music cds — from Pat Green, Cory Morrow, Owen Temple, and Roger Creager — at the Hastings in College Station. That was the beginning of my 15-plus years of digging this music. Spent a good deal more on OKOM in the next year and a half at that store, and later the one in Greenville. I’m sorry to see them go.

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I don’t know who was responsible for this, but it was well done, indeed.

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Aaron Watson exhibit at the Country Music Hall of Fame. Not bad for a guy who doesn’t exist.

Still, though, I keep thinking now of…

• The Band Perry, who seem to have gotten themselves a new major-label record deal in spite of making complete fools of themselves as artists; and

• Aerosmith frontman Steven Tyler, who got his own deal through Dot Records, a joint venture between Big Machine and the Republic Records unit of Universal Music Group…

…and how Watson told Saving Country Music that he shopped The Underdog to every label in Nashville, and as he put it, the album “wasn’t their cup of tea.”

I know that TBP is a known quantity, as is Steven Tyler even if he did make his mark in a different genre. And Aaron Watson, God bless him, has been ever-magnanimous and the consummate gentleman about his own situation, and it’s not like he’s in a bad place.

Still, though, I think all of this is a thoroughly damning commentary on the Nashville music establishment. And with Grady Smith leaving The Guardian, almost no one in the mainstream music press is calling any of this out for the BS that it is. Worse than that, even, to the extent that anyone is calling it out, they still don’t get it, as evidenced by the Washington Post calling Sam Hunt “progressive” and “forward thinking” and the Houston Press advocating that Beyonce be played on country radio when there’s so much other worthy country music from actual country artists being left on the table.

And it all makes me wonder if things are really going to get any better for the mainstream…