Narrative über Alles!

January 2, 2020

Wow, Francis, if you’re gonna lie, I guess you might as well be brazen about it, but wow.

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To paraphrase what Sabra said:

26 people were killed in Sutherland Springs. What’d we do in response? We changed the law to allow people to carry guns in church. How many people were killed in Fort Worth? Two. Clearly, what we are doing is working.

To think that shitweasel wanted to be president. For fuck’s sake.

Well, I mean…he’s right.

December 26, 2019

From Blabbermouth.net, a few days ago…

QUEENSRŸCHE’s TODD LA TORRE On Replacing GEOFF TATE: ‘We Couldn’t Have Asked For A Better Outcome’

…”I think, by and large, we’ve really kind of won over the majority of the QUEENSRŸCHE fanbase. I wasn’t just a one-album guy, so I think it really helps to solidify the lineup and the fact we’re still doing very good business. People are really interested to hear the new material live also, which is a great thing. I think it’s been a great success.”

Well, then.

Frankly, I’m of two minds regarding QR at this point. The music’s good and worth repeated listens, but it just seems different now that Scott Rockenfield’s not around and is likely not coming back. (Todd was the one playing the drums on the new album, The Verdict. Scott apparently has been taking time off since his wife had a baby back in 2017 and has been incommunicado with the band since.) And I was fine with both Chris and Geoff being gone, but now with Scott gone…I just don’t know. I like the previous two albums a lot better, and I am curious to see how The Verdict would have sounded had Scott participated in its creation.

That being said…

It might sound egotistical of Todd to say what he said, but given the ways things could have gone, I think he’s right. Had he not come along, we would have gotten a 25th-anniversary re-recording of Operation: Mindcrime that would have fallen far short of the original (see: Geoff Tate’s ca. 2011 voice and possibly Kelly Gray on guitar), and God only knows what would have followed. I’m just one guy, but given the choice, I would take what we got instead of what we could have gotten, even with as much as it’s changed in the last 4 years.

“Fly, fighting fair, it’s the code of the air….”

December 20, 2019

(Knight’s Cross mention added, per Borepatch in comments, who had a great post on this a few years ago.) 

76 years ago today, on December 20, 1943, an act of uncommon valor — a textbook demonstration of the warrior code — occurred in the skies over World War II Germany.

On that day, the 379th Bomb Group flying B-17s out of RAF Kimbolton went on a bomb run targeting a Focke-Wulf fighter aircraft plant just outside of Bremen. One of the pilots was Second Lieutenant Charles Brown, flying a B-17 christened “Ye Olde Pub.”  Brown’s B-17 was initially positioned toward the edges of the aircraft formation, but he was moved up to the front after several bombers had to turn back for mechanical issues. Shortly before the run, Brown’s plane sustained severe damage from flak and German fighters and fell toward the rear of and away from the formation. (Brown actually lost consciousness for a short period of time and almost crashed the plane before he recovered.) The stricken aircraft was spotted by several people on the ground, including Luftwaffe Oberleutnant Franz Stigler, who took off and caught up with Brown and his crew in short order. At that point, Stigler had shot down 22 B-17s in the war; just one more would have earned him a Knight’s Cross, Germany’s highest military award at the time.

But once Stigler caught up with Brown and his crew in his Bf-109, he was struck by the fact that they weren’t firing back at him or trying to evade him. He flew closer to the plane and saw the gravely injured crew through the gaping holes in the airframe, and Brown giving everything he had trying to keep the plane in the air. Stigler said later that with the condition of the plane and the crew, shooting at Brown’s plane would have been like shooting at a man in a parachute, and that he thought of what one of his former commanding officers told him: “If I ever see or hear of you shooting at a man in a parachute, I will shoot you myself….You follow the rules of war for you, not for your enemy. You fight by the rules to keep your humanity.”

Stigler tried but failed to get Brown’s attention and get him to land in Sweden; nevertheless, he escorted Brown out of German airspace past the fearsome, formidable defenses of the Atlantic Wall to the North Sea, saluted, and turned back for home. Brown and his crew made it back to base, where they were debriefed; their commanding officer said something to the effect of, “Yeah, you don’t say a word about this to anyone.” Stigler, for his part, told no one, least of all his commanding officers; he would likely have been executed for such an act. It was probably nothing less than divine providence that none of the Atlantic Wall gunners figured out what Stigler was doing, for if they had, they would almost certainly have shot him down.

Fast forward a little more than four decades. From Wikipedia:

“In 1986, the retired Lt. Col. Brown was asked to speak at a combat pilot reunion event called a ‘Gathering of the Eagles’ at the Air Command and Staff College at Maxwell AFB, Alabama. Someone asked him if he had any memorable missions during World War II; he thought for a minute and recalled the story of Stigler’s escort and salute. Afterwards, Brown decided he should try to find the unknown German pilot.  

“After four years of searching vainly for US Army Air Forces, U.S. Air Force and West German Air Force records that might shed some light on who the other pilot was, Brown had come up with little. He then wrote a letter to a combat pilot association newsletter. A few months later he received a letter from Stigler, who was now living in Canada. ‘I was the one,’ it said. When they spoke on the phone, Stigler described his plane, the escort and salute, confirming everything that Brown needed to hear to know he was the German fighter pilot involved in the incident.”

Stigler and Brown finally met in person in 1990 and became best friends for the rest of their lives; they died within a few months of each other in 2008. 

A book about the encounter, Adam Makos’ A Higher Call, was published in 2012, and it is an excellent book, one I absolutely cannot recommend highly enough. Sabaton bassist Pär Sundström, as the band was researching & writing songs for their 2014 album Heroes, was made aware of the story, and he and singer Joakim Broden wrote this song about that incident.

It all came full circle sometime after the album came out, when the band was contacted by Franz Stigler’s daughter.

“Hey guys. My son is a big fan of your band.”

Stigler’s grandson actually got to meet the band not long after.

“No Bullets Fly” was my most-played song on Spotify this year. Rather fitting, I suppose, as the Adam Makos book (at least so far) has been my favorite book that I have read this year. 

Monday music musings, 18.11.19

December 2, 2019

Not really too much I can say about the recent CMA Awards. They mirror the decline of mainstream country still. But I will say this:

Maren Morris winning Album of the Year was not any kind of win for Texas or Red Dirt music. Way too many people who ought to know better give her a pass because of her being from here. And they defend her by saying, “red dirt didn’t give her a chance, do you blame her for going to Nashville?” Well, no, but none of that makes the music suck any less. I will say that I thought the Highwomen album was surprisingly good and would be happy to see it win next year.

Watch it not even be nominated though.

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Recently on Reddit, some random made the argument that Johnny Cash was better than George Strait, and they cited the number of songs Cash had that crossed over to the pop chart. Which, frankly, I don’t understand in the least, because the number of crossover songs or albums for any artist in any genre is essentially not really worth that much when it comes to assessing said artist’s greatness because crossover success for any particular work isn’t worth that much when assessing said work’s greatness.

To use an example from another genre, Metallica crossed over like nobody’s business with the self-titled Black Album and the singles from it. We probably won’t see anything like that ever again. But was it the best thing they ever did? Nope. Was it among the best metal albums ever made? Not really. It was a fine hard rock album, one I will gladly admit to liking, but I could name a ton of metal albums from my iTunes library alone that were better (including all the albums Metallica recorded before that), from Black Sabbath’s Paranoid right on up to Sabaton’s The Art of War.

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Speaking of Sabaton…good Lord. I had heard of them some time ago and knew what they did, but it just didn’t appeal to me at first for some reason. I think it was Joakim Broden’s gruff vocals. But then I heard “Fields of Verdun” on one of my Spotify mixes last summer…

…and it…just…clicked. In a really, REALLY big way. They are now one of my absolute favorite bands.

Just when you think you’ve heard everything…

October 31, 2019

…something new comes along and makes you rethink that.

I have long thought that real country music and heavy metal have a lot in common despite the radical difference in sound. They’re both gritty, real explorations of the human condition at their best. A buddy of mine made the observation that country & metal are like estranged cousins who meet at a family reunion & discover they have a lot in common. Which is an excellent way of putting it, if you really think about it.

You’ll remember some time ago that DevilDriver frontman Dez Fafara did a project with a lot of other metal guys where they recorded a lot of classic country songs. I listened to some of it here and there, and while it wasn’t quite my thing, I rather appreciated what they were trying to do. I thought it was the first of its kind…

…but apparently I was mistaken.

Screwing around on Spotify today, I saw a 2006 album from a dude named Jeff Walker called Welcome to Carcass Cuntry — Carcass, as in the English death metal band (Walker is that band’s bass player). Actually, what I saw was a song from that album on one of my Spotify daily mixes, a song called “You’re Still On My Mind.”

Wait, is that the song I think it is?

It sure as fuck was.

An old George Jones weeper that hardly anyone remembers anymore! Gotta admit, I thought that was pretty damn impressive. But that was far from the only thing. There were also a couple of Hank Sr. covers (“I Can’t Help It If I’m Still In Love With You” and “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry”) and Connie Smith’s “Once A Day.” (Connie freaking Smith! I NEVER would have seen that coming.) Gotta admit, those choices kinda blew my fuses. Seems like so many metalheads have more respect for country music than a lot of the people who allegedly sing it. Between Florida-Georgia Line name-dropping Hank and Jeff Walker singing actual Hank songs, I will take the latter any day of the week and twice on Sundays.

Sunday music musings, 27.10.2019

October 27, 2019

Many years ago, when I was young and stupid, I would be nonplussed when my favorite artists, songs, albums, whatever, didn’t win certain awards. Then I discovered the Texas music scene and all the artists who wouldn’t ever win any of those awards, and I left that attitude behind and never looked back.

That being said, if you needed yet more proof that mainstream country music in the ’10s has been a shitshow without equal, here you go:

Luke Bryan Wins Inaugural ACM Album Of The Decade Award For ‘Crash My Party’

I suppose it could have been worse — after all, 2013 was also the year of FGL’s debut — but in a decade that brought us George Strait’s Here For A Good Time, Jason Isbell’s Something More Than Free, and Randy Rogers’ and Wade Bowen’s Hold My Beer, Vol. 1….well, frankly, I got nothin’.

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And then to top the ’10s off, there’s this:

But all of a sudden Hootie & the Blowfish—not just Darius Rucker—is signed to Universal Music Group’s country imprint in Nashville, is planning to release a new record on November 1st called Imperfect Circle, and just released a straight up pop rock Hootie & the Blowfish single called “Hold On” that has just become the “most added” song on COUNTRY radio, rocketing all the way to #30 on the charts upon its debut. That’s right, as we were all jamming out to the new Cody Jinks records, Hootie & the Blowfish has officially become a country music group with a major label deal, full support from country radio, and all the other rights and privileges of a mainstream country music act thereof.

Look, I know that Reba McEntire said a few years ago that ’70s rock was country now, and that she was at best neutral about it, but frankly, I think Dale Watson’s take on it was a lot more accurate. And that phenomenon kinda scares me, really. What’s ’20s country going to sound like? If the progression holds, it’s gonna be fucking Poison and Motley Crue. (Not Metallica or Iron Maiden, because that stuff’s too songwriterly.) And in the ’30s…well, the less said the better.

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For longer than I am willing to admit, I thought Free was “that band that did ‘All Right Now,’ that band that Paul Rodgers fronted before Bad Company.”

They had more songs than that — six albums’ worth, even. A lot of those songs were really good, too. I don’t know what I’d count as the bigger crime against music, the fact that Free is mainly known for that one song or the fact that so few people know Fleetwood Mac as it existed before Lindsey Buckingham & Stevie Nicks.

“So this is how liberty dies…”

September 15, 2019

…or, What conversation?

“O’Rourke promises he will ‘bring everyone in America into the conversation— Republicans, Democrats, gun-owners, and non-gun-owners alike.’ But if a gun owner says he’d prefer to keep his property rather than surrender it to the federal government, that’s too bad.”

That’s about right. Bob has made it quite plain he doesn’t give a shit about the gun owners’ side of all this. Which in its own way is admirable, because neither do any of the other Democrats running. Bob was just the one to say it out loud.

Of course, not only does his bold declaration expose the “no one wants to take your guns” as the foul and malicious lie that it has always been, but it also goes a long way towards killing certain other measures, i.e., universal background checks for ALL firearms sales.

How is that, you ask?

Well, think about it. How is the government going to know whether the law is being obeyed, i.e., whether a given weapon was sold with or without a background check? Registration, that’s how. And what do we always say?

“Registration leads to confiscation.”

To which liberals have always said, “No one wants to take your guns, you paranoid wing nuts!”

And Bob has come out here and said, in effect, “uh, yeah we do.”

To thunderous applause, even.

Come on, Jason, really?

September 10, 2019

I do love Jason Isbell, but this is just next-level stupid, and considering all his Twitter rantings on gun control, that’s really saying something:

“Women are practically ghosts on country radio too, so it’s not hard to understand why female artists like (Maren) Morris, who had massive crossover success with the Zedd collaboration ‘The Middle,’ might pull away from the genre and gravitate to more welcoming formats like pop and Americana. ‘The country purists online, they’re the worst,’ Isbell says shortly after rolling up a pant leg to show off his ‘Highwomen’ tattoo, as well as some swell printed socks. ‘If you look at the country radio charts, and there is one woman every three weeks in the Top 20, what’s going to encourage women to try to make music in that direction?’

Wow, dude, way to make fans of more traditional country music fans not want to give the Highwomen album a chance. I mean, it’s not the revolutionary, world-beating stuff some people are claiming it to be, but this online country purist heard it and thought it was actually pretty good. I don’t intend to get it just yet, because I have other stuff I’d like to get first, but I do hope it does well so as to encourage more music like it.

Also, Willie Nelson would like a word with those of you who think “If She Ever Leaves Me” was the first gay country song.

Heroes? Negative, Ghostrider.

August 26, 2019

…or, if you needed yet more proof that Houston police chief Art Acevedo is still a flaming pile of shit, here you go:

“I still think they’re heroes,” Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo says of the narcotics officers who shot and killed Dennis Tuttle and Rhogena Nicholas during a fraudulent drug raid at their Harding Street home on January 28. At a press conference Friday, Acevedo said Gerald Goines, the officer who instigated the raid by falsely claiming that a confidential informant had bought heroin from Tuttle at the house the day before, and Steven Bryant, who bolstered Goines’ cover story, had “dishonored” their badges and the Houston Police Department (HPD). But Acevedo insisted that the other officers who participated in the raid had “acted in good faith” and killed the couple in self-defense.

I do not mean necessarily to bash the other cops involved here. They may well have acted in good faith. They were put in a bad position by their superiors, and said superiors should fry for their actions. But calling them heroes is just a bridge too far for me. And “acted in self-defense”? Ah, no, Chief. People without badges don’t get to play that card when they’re the ones initiating the confrontation, and people with badges shouldn’t get to do it either, particularly in a situation like this.

Wednesday political musings, 21.08.2019

August 21, 2019

Quote from elsewhere:

“The gun industry and the gun lobby are the problem. They won’t even let us do common sense reforms.”

No. NO SIR. If you’re gonna point the finger at anyone for pro-gunners’ refusing to compromise anymore, you need to be pointing the finger at Dianne Feinstein for giving away the endgame on 60 Minutes right after the 1994 “assault weapons” ban was passed.

For anyone who might have forgotten:

“If I could have gotten 51 votes in the Senate of the United States for an outright ban, picking up every one of them — Mr. and Mrs. America, turn them all in — I would have done it.”

Also, while I say this specifically in the context of more gun control, it actually is more universal than that:

“Polls reflect that the public wants tighter gun control.”

Yeah, that and a five-spot will get you a sausage-and-egg taco and a cup of coffee at any Bill Miller’s here in San Antonio before 10:30 AM. All this supposed “silent majority” allegedly in favor of more gun laws has had to do since 1994 is vote in people who will pass those gun laws, but they have yet to get off their asses and do it, so they obviously don’t want it bad enough, if they want it at all, which at this point I frankly just do not believe. And if they don’t want it badly enough to vote for politicians who will vote for it, well, that has the exact effect of not wanting it at all.

Which, of course, brings us back to polls in general. How many polls, to cite perhaps the most infamous recent example, said Hillary Clinton was going to lay a 1984-level ass-whipping on Donald Trump in the 2016 election right up until she didn’t?

And I am really, really getting tired of the whole “b-b-b-but muh tanks and drones” when it comes to stopping tyranny with rifles. It’s as if no one has any concept of how guerrilla warfare works. That drone, just to take one example, is not going to be of much use if the pilot gets shot in his driveway, or the mechanic has his throat slit in some seedy Vegas strip joint, or the armorer has his morning coffee laced with cyanide.